Madeline E. Schreiber

Professor

The overarching goal of Dr. Madeline Schreiber’s research in chemical hydrogeology is to develop approaches to make quantitative predictions about solute behavior in natural waters. This effort aims to answer three kinds of questions: 1) How are solutes released to water?; 2) Once released, what processes control solute movement?; and 3) What chemical, physical and biological processes affect the fate of solutes? Dr. Schreiber and her research group use field observations, laboratory experiments and numerical models to tackle challenging questions about solute behavior, with a practical goal of protecting water quality. Research results from her group have been published in leading journals in hydrogeology, low temperature geochemistry, and environmental science. Her projects are supported by diverse funding sources, including NSF and other federal agencies, industry, non-profits, and private foundations.

Education

Ph.D., Geology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1999

M.S., Geology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1995

B.S. Geology, Yale University, 1991

The overarching goal of my research in chemical hydrogeology is to develop approaches to make quantitative predictions about solute behavior in natural waters. This effort aims to answer three kinds of questions: 1) How are solutes released to water?; 2) Once released, what processes control solute movement?; and 3) What chemical, physical and biological processes affect the fate of solutes? My students and I use field observations, laboratory experiments and numerical models to tackle challenging questions about solute behavior, with a practical goal of protecting water quality. Research results from my group have been published in leading journals in my hydrogeology, low temperature geochemistry, and environmental science.Projects are supported by diverse funding sources, including NSF and other federal agencies, industry, non-profits, and private foundations.

Graduate Students

  • Zackary Munger, PhD, Manganese cycling in rivers and reservoirs
  • Brady Ziegler, PhD, Biogeochemical influences on arsenic cycling in petroleum plumes
  • Tiffany VanDerwerker, MS, Using logistic regression models to evaluate geologic influences on arsenic in Virginia’s groundwater

Recent Publications (* graduate student)

  • Eagle S*, Orndorff W, Schwartz B, Doctor D, Gerst J*, Schreiber M. 2016. Analysis of hydrologic and geochemical time series data at James Cave, Virginia: Implications for epikarst influence on recharge in Appalachian karst aquifers. Geological Society of America Special Paper 516.
  • Cozzarelli I, Schreiber M, Erickson M, Ziegler B*. 2016. Arsenic cycling in hydrocarbon plumes: Secondary effects of natural attenuation. Groundwater 54(1): 35-45. Schreiber M, Schwartz B, Orndorff W, Doctor D, Eagle S*, Gerst J*. 2015. Instrumenting caves to collect hydrologic and geochemical data: Example from James Cave, Virginia, in Younos T and Parece T (eds). Advances in Watershed Science and Assessment, Handbook of Environmental Chemistry 33: 205-231; Springer.
  • Levitan DM*, Zipper C, Donavan P, Schreiber ME, Seal RR, Engle MA, Chermak JA, Bodnar RJ, Johnson DK*, Aylor J. 2015. Statistical analysis of soil geochemical data to identify pathfinders associated with mineral deposits: An example from the Coles Hill uranium deposit, Virginia, USA. Journal of Geochemical Exploration 154: 238-251.
  • Chermak J and ME Schreiber. 2014. Mineralogy and trace element geochemistry of gas shales in the United States: Environmental implications. International Journal of Coal Geology 126: 32-44.
  • Levitan DM* Schreiber ME, Seal RR, Zipper C, Donavan P, Bodnar RJ, Aylor J. 2014. Environmental baseline characterization of an undeveloped ore deposit: An example from the Coles Hill uranium deposit, Virginia, USA. Applied Geochemistry 43: 88-100.
  • Oyewumi O*, Ciparis S* and ME Schreiber. 2014. The impact of poultry litter application on sediment chemistry of the Broadkill River estuary system, Delaware. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 186 (1): 97-115.
  • Basu A* and ME Schreiber. 2013. Arsenic release from arsenopyrite weathering: Insights from sequential extraction and microscopic studies.Journal of Hazardous Materials 262: 896-904.
  • Schreiber ME and JD Rimstidt. 2013. Trace element source terms for mineral dissolution. Applied Geochemistry 37: 94-101.
  • Resources Geology and the Environment (GEOS 1024)
  • Geoscience Fundamentals (GEOS 2004)
  • Groundwater Hydrology (GEOS 4804/5804G)
  • Chemical Hydrogeology (GEOS 5834)
  • Special Topics in Hydrogeology (GEOS 6804)
     
  • Chair, Geological Society of America (GSA) Hydrogeology Division, 2014-2015
  • Kavli Fellow, National Academy of Sciences, 2013
  • Carroll B. Shannon Certificate of Teaching Excellence, College of Science, Virginia Tech, 2013
  • GSA Fellow, Elected 2009
Madeline Schreiber